Inspiration

German Museum Experiments With Novel Approach to Charging Its Visitors

Over Christmas the museum experimented with a “pay-as-you-stay” model, charging €1 per 10 minutes.

Here is the article from MuseumNext: www.museumnext.com/article/german-museum-experiments-with-novel-approach-to-charging-its-visitors/

Hate paying ticket booking fees? What if they were used for charitable causes?

When buying a ticket to an event no one is a fan of the fees ticketing platforms charge on top of the actual ticket prices. But what if this charge was used for charitable causes?

Humanitix is an events ticketing platform that does exactly that. They direct the profits made from ticket booking fees towards global education projects.

So far they say they have given more than $300,000 to their charity partners. Started in Australia, New Zealand is the first country they have expanded to. And they are not afraid to take on the big players in the ticketing market. Fittingly, they say that they learnt in their journey that the customer experience is right at the crux of being a successful company.

Links: Humanitix article, Humanitix website

Supermarket ‘quiet hour’ for customers with autism

A great example of how initiatives for special needs benefit many more people:

One of New Zealand’s supermarket chains has introduced a low-sensory “quiet hour” nationwide. It is “easy on the eyes and ears by reducing noise, lighting and other distractions in-store” and has been developed with support of Autism New Zealand.

“The lovely thing about quiet hour is that we have had very positive feedback from so many customers. Our older customers seem to really enjoy quiet hours too, as well as many other Kiwis who actually just find shopping a bit stressful and can now visit at a more peaceful time.”

General manager Kiri Hannifin

Here is the Countdown press release, and an article in the Guardian.

In Defense of Museum Benches

There aren’t enough benches in museums, says David Whitemyer in an article for the American Alliance of Museums, and I agree.

He suggests 4 things to consider:

  1. Help visitors slow down
  2. Make [benches] part of the plan
  3. Encourage hanging out
  4. Know the rules

“Whoever first came up with the idea is a genius: free public resting places where you can take time out from the bustle and brouhaha of the city, and simply sit and watch and reflect.” 

British writer Tom Hodgkinson

Why we like a picture or the hierarchy of visitor needs

Reapplying Maslov’s pyramid of needs to the museum visit

The cartoon is a fun expression of the hierarchy of visitors’ needs.

Working on a visitor experience plan for a client, I was thinking about the hierarchy of needs of visitors to cultural organisations. In an audience research project at Tate a few years ago (with the brilliant Dr Bob Cook from firefish), we found that visitors’ needs fall into a hierarchy similar to Maslov’s pyramid of needs. This proved helpful when thinking through the visitor journey and how to improve the visitor experience.

We found that accessibility and comfort needs had to be met before visitors could move to a more transformational level of enjoying the visit with others, learning and inspiration. This made us think about what expectations we set, how we help visitor to navigate the space, how the environment feels and what information we provide – these are all elements of a good foundation that can be a catalyst for a higher experience in the museum.

Seven Things Data-Informed Organisations Do Differently (3/4 and 4/4)

4/4 of Colleen Dilenschneider’s steps to a data informed organisation

Here is the forth post of Colleen’s path to becoming a data informed organisation: Seven Things Data-Informed Organisations Do Differently.

The 7 things are:

  1. Bring everyone to the same level of understanding;
  2. Incorporate data into all planning processes (not just marketing);
  3. Develop measurable objectives and metrics for success;
  4. Continuously gather market data and update plans accordingly;
  5. Take advantage of the predictive power of data;
  6. Look at market research as an investment rather than a cost; and
  7. Are actively shifting the organization’s culture

For me no7 is bringing it all together – a culture change. This is about attitudes to data, but I think behind this needs to be a positive attitude and approach to people – eventually it is not about data, but about our visitors, audience, customers, whatever we choose to call them, and about understanding them and showing empathy.

BTW, I realise I didn’t post Colleen’s third blog, here it is if you want to complete the series and hear about common cognitive biases to data: Accepting Data Can Be Hard

Creating diverse boards

Becoming a truly inclusive organisation starts at the top

Becoming a truly inclusive organisation starts at the top, says Cath Hume, CEO of the Arts Marketing Association (UK) as she writes about the AMA’s process to get to a more diverse board. She also admits that “There have been difficult conversations along the way. Talking about inclusivity and access can be challenging, emotional, personal and delicate.”

Read more in her article on ArtsProfessional .