Available insight into cultural audiences and Covid-19

With Auckland currently going in and out of lockdowns and inspired by a blog post by Christina Lister Comms in the UK (thank you Christina) I thought it might be helpful to list the research that’s available about audiences and Covid.

Thank you to all the organisations that are so generously making their data available for free. 

Most relevant (not just in a New Zealand context) I found: 
  • Culture Segments and Covid Audience Mindsets: Useful for those working with Culture Segments and Audience Atlas, MHM have looked into how the segments engaged during lockdowns and their attitudes to re-engaging after openings. Attitudes to re-engaging seem to be roughly in line with the segments’ general attitude to taking risk with culture.
    If you are new to Culture Segments, check them out here.  
  • Secondary reopening trends for visitor attractions: In a live video on 24 Feb 2021, Dexibit shared trends in 2021 for visitor attractions who are reopening: the latest on visitation recovery, visitor behaviour like attrition and spend and what to expect for the rest of the year.
    Dexibit also offer the Recovery Index, a free dashboard that allows you to compare your visitation to the equivalent time last year and rate of recovery and put it into context globally and locally. 
  • COVID-19 Audience Outlook Monitor Australia: This is a three-phase study by Patternmakers in partnership with international research partner WolfBrown. It tracks how audiences feel about returning to events in the context of the pandemic and was conducted in May, July and September 2020, with three more phases planned for 2021. It includes data about audience attitudes and behaviours, and how they are changing over time with indicators like attendance, ticket buying and spending, and measures things like comfort at different types of venues and confidence in different safety measures. It includes an interesting fact sheet on disability.
Interesting data from other parts of the world – UK: 
  • Culture Restart is a national tracker of cultural audiences and visitors during Covid-19 by the Insights Alliance, a collaboration by Indigo Ltd, Baker Richards and One Further. With several surveys since October 2020, it supports cultural organisations in planning for reopening, including the appeal of digital content and willingness to pay for it, both before and after re-opening.
  • Indigo’s recent After the Interval and Act 2 surveys asked UK audience members about their attitudes to missing live events during Covid-19, how they were engaging with culture during lockdown and when they anticipated returning to live events in the future. 
  • The Family Arts Campaign and Indigo have worked together to look specifically at family audiences. There are a few key areas in which families differ significantly, these are price sensitivity, social distancing, digital content, outdoors and Christmas.
  • Indigo also released a special report on disabled audiences. The headline finding is that “77% of disabled audiences consider themselves to be ‘vulnerable to Coronavirus’ whilst only 28% of non-disabled audiences do”. 
Data from the US:
  • LaPlaca Cohen shares  Culture + Community in a Time of Crisis: A Special Edition of Culture Track, a national research and strategy initiative for US cultural organisations with Key Findings documents, raw data tables and an interactive tool.
  • And Colleen Dilenschneider shares data from Impact’s research with US visitor attractions in a Covid-19 section on her Know Your Own Bone blog
DIY?
  • Lastly, you might want to conduct your own research. But what if there is no budget to outsource research? Well, with some careful planning it can also be done in-house. MHM helpfully shared their 5 tips to get the most from in-house evaluation
  1. Starting thinking about evaluation early
  2. Start by asking — what are you trying to achieve?
  3. Take an audience-focused approach
  4. Mix your methods to cover a range of outcomes
  5. Push for objectivity – challenge your assumptions

Have you come across other useful data? I’d love to expand the list and share what you found useful. Please get in touch.

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Cultural venues open for visitors again – see how they did it in Auckland

#ReopenRun

A series of videos showing how major Auckland cultural venues are re-opening to the public with a visitor perspective as well as behind-the-scenes insights and interviews, filmed by Dexibit.

See the videos here: #ReopenRun

Image: Dexibit

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Which types of cultural organisations will people likely visit after the pandemic?

Early indications on intention to visit

Cultural organisations are closed in most countries and will be for a while. US research agency IMPACT is looking into data that can help prepare for the time when organisations can re-open.

The key data they analyse is “intent to visit”. Colleen Dilenschneider is sharing this data weekly now in her blog Know-your-own-bone.

The data is US focused so to be taken cautiously as an indicator for other markets, and it is early days, and as we see with this crisis, things can change very quickly. Keeping this in mind, I find Colleen’s conclusion interesting that

“demand for cultural enterprise will not be (at least immediately) distributed as it was pre-coronavirus.”

The data indicates demand for visits might be redistributed away from some organisation types and towards others, which will be important to consider for re-opening. Three main trends seem to emerge and sound like common sense in the current environment:

  • Cultural experiences that allow for relative freedom of movement and in particular outside spaces (such as public parks, botanic gardens, zoos, aquariums, historic sites, museums) may get increased demand;
  • Enclosed spaces with minimal visitor movement (such as performing arts) may get less demand;
  • Tactile experiences (such as those offered at science centres) may get less demand.

The data is from the US and still very fresh, thus might change, however, it might trigger some useful discussions for the planning of the eventual reopening: What practical measures will be required to allow physical distancing? What reassurances are needed? How to best communicate this.

Read the whole article on Know-your-own-bone

Photo by cottonbro from Pexels

Navigating the crisis

The difficult choices ahead for funders supporting the arts out of the crisis

The pandemic is a big challenge for the cultural sector and things might not be the same again once we have overcome it.

Alan Brown of WolfBrown, a research and consulting firm serving the arts and culture sector, offers a sobering view of the decisions that will need to be taken to rebuild the arts sector after the Covid-19 crisis in this article. While written from a US perspective, it provides challenging food for thought relevant in other parts of the world.

For arts funders, the moral dimensions of the COVID-19 crisis are heartbreaking but unavoidable.

Alan Brown

In a sector where many are under financial strain even in the best of times, some of the tough questions he brings up are:

  • Should funders continue supporting the same organizations they give grants to year after year, or shift focus to other, more vulnerable organizations?
  • Should support of institutions be prioritized above support of self-employed arts workers?
  • Should funding be prioritized for keeping viable nonprofits going, or for salvaging the assets of those whose only option is bankruptcy?
  • Or, should capital be preserved for supporting the eventual ramp up of programming activity amongst those fortunate enough to survive?

His article kicks off a series of papers, blogs and announcements by WolfBrown that will examine the arts sector’s response to COVID-19. Read the article here, where you can also subscribe to the series.